John Maytham speaks with Jacqueline Boyd, Senior Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University.

  • Dedicated channel will provide different content for dogs, ranging from calming visuals to more active scenes and sounds
  • A TV left on for a dog left alone at home could be stimulating for the animal
  • Dogs got used to people being at home a lot more because of the lockdown

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A recently launched TV channel devoted to dogs seems to be, well, barking madly.

However, our pets often spend long periods of time at home alone, and providing some form of enrichment and stimulation can be of great benefit to dogs and their owners.

Jacqueline Boyd, senior lecturer in animal science at Nottingham Trent University, thinks it’s a good idea.

The programs seem to vary from very relaxed, to calming visuals and sounds, to a little more active.

Jacqueline Boyd – Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University

Dogs seem to vary in the way they react to television and anyone who lives with dogs will know that some dogs will actively engage with television and other dogs will ignore television altogether.

Jacqueline Boyd – Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University

It’s not so much that the dogs are going to sit down and watch an entire movie or TV program. Rather, it’s about adding some stimulation to their surroundings.

Jacqueline Boyd – Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University

One of the big issues with some of our dogs unfortunately is that when we go to work or go out we leave the house in complete silence. It is very foreign to the dog. Something as simple as leaving the television on can actually create that level of normalcy and the idea of ​​leaving stimulation to the dog so that you don’t get some of the problematic separation-related behaviors that sometimes occur when they do. are left alone.

Jacqueline Boyd – Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University

With the confinements, the dogs were spending a lot more time with us in the home environment. This is one way to mitigate some of the changes resulting from lockout situations.

Jacqueline Boyd – Lecturer in Animal Science at Nottingham Trent University

Scroll to the top of the article to listen to the interview.


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